How were the aboriginal treated by the British?

Settlers often killed Aborigines who trespassed onto ‘their’ land. Many Aborigines moved to the towns to try and make a living. Here they suffered discrimination and disease, with alcoholism being a particular problem.

How were Aboriginal treated in Australia?

Neck chains were used while Aboriginal men were marched from their homelands into prisons, concentration camps known as missions and lock hospitals or forced into slavery. Women were also forced into slavery as domestic servants. The oppression continues today as well.

What was the relationship between the British and the aboriginals?

Early relations were typically friendly, and the British government instructed the colonists to respect Indigenous rights. But as the colony spread inland from the coast, competition for land and resources bred conflict. The consequences of colonization on Indigenous Australians were devastating.

How were the aboriginals affected by the British?

British explorers unknowingly exposed Australia’s Indigenous people to many varieties of disease, such as smallpox, tuberculosis, influenza, measles, whooping cough and the common cold. In 1789, a year after the First Fleet arrived, a smallpox outbreak killed many of the Indigenous people that lived in the Sydney area.

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What did the Aboriginals call Australia?

The Aboriginal English words ‘blackfella’ and ‘whitefella’ are used by Indigenous Australian people all over the country — some communities also use ‘yellafella’ and ‘coloured’.

How did the British gain control of Australia?

The rise of the British empire in Australia

He landed in Australia in 1770 and claimed it as a British territory. The process of colonisation began in 1788. A fleet of 11 ships, containing 736 convicts, some British troops and a governor set up the first colony of New South Wales.

Why did Britain take over Australia?

The reasons that led the British to invade Australia were simple. The prisons in Britain had become unbearably overcrowded, a situation worsened by the refusal of America to take any more convicts after the American War of Independence in 1783.

How many Australian Aboriginal were killed?

After European settlers arrived in 1788, thousand of aborigines died from diseases; colonists systematically killed many others. At first contact, there were over 250,000 aborigines in Australia. The massacres ended in the 1920 leaving no more than 60,000.

How did British colonization affect Australia?

The expansion of British colonies, including the establishments in Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania), Adelaide, Moreton Bay (Brisbane) and Port Phillip (Melbourne), resulted in competition over land and resources, and quickly resulted in violence.

What impacts did the spread and growth of the British settlement have on Aboriginal people?

The impact of early colonisation on Indigenous People : Disease. The most immediate consequence of colonisation was a wave of epidemic diseases including smallpox, measles and influenza, which spread ahead of the settlement frontier and annihilated many Indigenous communities.

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What happened to the Aboriginal land when the British settled in Australia?

From 1788, Australia was treated by the British as a colony of settlement, not of conquest. Aboriginal land was taken over by British colonists on the premise that the land belonged to no-one (‘terra nullius’).

Is it OK to say Aboriginal?

And if you are talking about both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, it’s best to say either ‘Indigenous Australians’ or ‘Indigenous people’. Without a capital “a”, “aboriginal” can refer to an Indigenous person from anywhere in the world. The word means “original inhabitant” in Latin.

Are there any full blooded Aboriginal peoples left?

However, in 1889 Parliament recognised Fanny Cochrane Smith (d:1905) as the last surviving full-blooded Tasmanian Aboriginal person. The 2016 census reported 23,572 Indigenous Australians in the state of Tasmania.

What is considered rude in Aboriginal culture?

For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, avoidance of eye contact is customarily a gesture of respect. In Western society averting gaze can be viewed as being dishonest, rude Page 2 or showing lack of interest.