Why was Northern Ireland at war?

The conflict began during a campaign by the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association to end discrimination against the Catholic/nationalist minority by the Protestant/unionist government and local authorities. The government attempted to suppress the protests.

What was the IRA fighting for?

The Irish Republican Army (IRA; Irish: Óglaigh na hÉireann), also known as the Provisional Irish Republican Army, and informally as the Provos, was an Irish republican paramilitary organisation that sought to end British rule in Northern Ireland, facilitate Irish reunification and bring about an independent, socialist …

Why did Ireland go to war with England?

It began because of the 1916 Easter Rising. The Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB) men who fought the British soldiers that day wanted Ireland to be its own country and wanted Britain to move its army out of Ireland.

What was the start of the Troubles in Northern Ireland?

Unlike the “Provisionals”, the “Officials” did not think that Ireland could be unified until the Protestant majority of Northern Ireland and Catholic minority of Northern Ireland were at peace with each other.

Official Irish Republican Army.

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Official Irish Republican Army (Óglaigh na hÉireann)
Size 1,500–2,000 (between 1969 and 1972)

Why did Britain give up Ireland?

Both times the measure was rejected for two main reasons: There were a large number of people in Ireland who wanted to keep the Union between Britain and Ireland. Most of these Unionists lived in Ulster. Many British MPs felt that if Ireland got Home Rule then the rest of the British Empire would fall apart.

Why did Ireland and Northern Ireland split?

Northern Ireland was created in 1921, when Ireland was partitioned by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, creating a devolved government for the six northeastern counties. The majority of Northern Ireland’s population were unionists, who wanted to remain within the United Kingdom.

Who was the IRA fighting against?

In 1969, the more traditionalist republican members split off into the Provisional IRA and Sinn Féin. The Provisional IRA operated mostly in Northern Ireland, using violence against the Royal Ulster Constabulary and the British Army, and British institutions and economic targets.

Does the IRA still exist?

It is the largest and most active of the “dissident republican” paramilitary groups operating against the British security forces. It has targeted the security forces in firearm attacks and bombings, and with grenades, mortars and rockets.

How did Ireland suffer due to British dominance?

Answer: In legend, the British were violent occupiers of Ireland whose unreasoning cruelty defines the struggle that made the Republic. A typical tale is the Battle of Augrim 1691. In this, according to the legend, the usual evil English defeated the long-suffering Irish.

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Are Northern Irish people British?

Residents of Northern Ireland, like all other residents of the United Kingdom, have British citizenship. Therefore we can say that those in the North are British. However, Northern Ireland is still located on the island of Ireland. The inhabitants of the island are called the Irish.

Is Ireland Catholic or Protestant?

Religion. Ireland has two main religious groups. The majority of Irish are Roman Catholic, and a smaller number are Protestant (mostly Anglicans and Presbyterians). However, there is a majority of Protestants in the northern province of Ulster.

What percentage of Northern Ireland is Catholic?

Like Great Britain (but unlike most of the Republic of Ireland), Northern Ireland has a plurality of Protestants (48% of the resident population are either Protestant, or brought up Protestant, while 45% of the resident population are either Catholic, or brought up Catholic, according to the 2011 census) and its people …

Who negotiated peace in Northern Ireland?

Majority opinion in the future could be tested by referendum. The two main political parties to the Agreement were the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), led by David Trimble and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), led by John Hume. The two leaders jointly won the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize.